Little Suzuki TU250

The general Seca II forum. XJ600 centric but all motorbikes welcome!
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radare
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Tue Jul 11, 2017 1:38 am

Here's where I am, guys: The Scrambler has an off-idle bog. The black/red bike has some mid-band lean issues. And the damned Triumph is surging at cruising speed. I'm about sick of all three at the moment.

I've been thinking of a conversation I had with Ed a few weeks back, about his little DR350 putting him back into a place of enjoying motorcycles. The discussion revolved around the simplicity and the enjoyment that got us into motorcycles in the first place.

I am a UJM kind of guy; not big on plastic fairings and flash. I'm also relatively light at 148 pounds (5'11).

I am giving serious thought to buying a Suzuki TU250 and selling off some of my current stock. What are your thoughts on this notion? It's light, fuel injected and I like the styling. It's also slow. I like that too as I hate, absolutely hate cruising along on a motorbike on a long stretch of straight road at 75mph. Having a reason to tool along country roads at 55 sounds great to me.

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Jimbo
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Tue Jul 11, 2017 6:17 am

Buying a smaller bike is fine. They have their allure. I'm 5'9" and 170lbs. Having owned many bikes from 49cc scooters/mopeds to 1000cc motorcycles, every bike has its place. I loved riding the little scooters/mopeds for just buzzing around the neighborhood at only 25mph. It was fun to be able to just hop on with a helmet and go. Riding a scooter you tend to feel much like riding a bicycle since your going about as fast. So don't think of putting on all your usual protective motorcycle gear. Then there's the smaller 200-300cc bikes (like your looking at) which are fun given their light weight and usually single cylinder. The simplicity is great and the added bonus of fuel economy fantastic! One of my favorite bikes in that range was the Yamaha TW200. It was slow, but fun and stable with those unique fat tires. Simple and dead reliable. I also changed the sprockets for more practical street riding and was able to get right up to 100mpg for my daily commute! Still could do short stretches of highway if needed. If I had to say the ideal displacement for all around use and embracing the simple qualities of this subject thread, I would say it would be in the 350-400cc range. Just enough power to not be considered slow yet light weight and still very fuel efficient. My current ride is a Buell Blast that I picked up cheap and have been playing around with. I do mixed driving for my commute. The Buell Blast is a 500cc single with hydraulic valve lifters (no valve adjustments), air cooled (no coolant to service), belt drive (no chain adjustments) and small and nimble (tiny looking when placed next to even the Seca). Still has a carb, but there is only one (no carb synching). Still has its pitfalls (namely vibration now) that I am addressing, but it is "my version" of what you are thinking about. I still loved my XJ600S so don't get me wrong, but I also was looking for cheap simple riding pleasure too and something different. If I had the space and money, I probably would have 4 or 5 bikes spanning the displacement as stated earlier. Grab one for your mood or need at the time then. Every size and complexity has its purpose. Right now this seems to fit my overall needs and desire for simplicity.

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TonyKZ1
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Tue Jul 11, 2017 9:04 am

You might also look at the Yamaha SR400 as it's also an air-cooled, fuel injected, 400cc single cylinder standard bike. The one thing about the SR400 is that it's a kickstart only bike, no electric leg (ie. starter) but it's said that it's so easy to start that it's not really a problem either. There's a few guys on advrider that's got them along with the TU250, Royal Enfield 500s, and other lower cc bikes, here's a link to that topic.
1997 Yamaha Seca II - mostly stock, Racetech upgraded forks, FZ6R rear shock, Oxford Adventure Style Heated Grips, Barkbusters Blizzard Cold Weather Handguards, a Scottoiler vSystem chain oiler. My Mileage Tracker Page.

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Siper2
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Wed Jul 19, 2017 10:57 pm

I **love** the TU250X. Rode one for my MSF course in 2013 - what a riot! As a new rider though, it was perfect for me.

I'd be very happy indeed, to own one. I'd still want something beefier (for now the Seca's just fine in that regard), but I'd love to have a TU in my garage. :thumbsup:

I just sold a 2003 Suzuki Savage that I'd bought for my wife, in 2015. She unfortunately wasn't able to ride due to illness, but I did bum around on it particularly in 2016 while my Seca was in pieces for my naked conversion. The Savage/LS650P/S40 is a *great*, underrated bike. Here's two of the many shots I took for the sale ad:

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The only things I did with it under my ownership were one oil change, replaced the rusted windshield brackets and mounts, and replaced the OE mirrors which were flopping all over (with Bikemaster units). Otherwise the previous owner had just put new tires on it, so it needed very little. Had a bit of surface rust here and there, but ran like a top.

These have been around since '86 and are therefore plentiful. I found oil changes to be more annoying than they should be, due to the drain plug location, and sparkplugs are annoying since it's a thumper and you have to lift the tank up. Otherwise, it's a belt drive and about as simple as a motorcycle can get. Plus it's got loads more twist than any 250! Delkevic makes a pipe for it too, if you want a wee bit more sound (I never got around to it).

Mine had the 5-speed, I think that came about in 2002. In 2005 they went to straight/drag bars, which I'd recommend. The bent bars on ours were good for short riders, but I'm 5'11" and my arms were bent WAY too much. The seat height is extremely low too, like crazy low, but since you and I are the same height (though I've got about 40 lbs on you), I think with longer-reach bars it wouldn't be too shabby.

There's a walkthrough on the Savage forum to get rid of the engine backfire, too. Basically replacing a nylon carb washer with two thinner metal washers to richen the mixture. Suzuki tunes them VERY lean, no doubt to pass emissions in the 21st century. :lolno:

Anyway, food for thought!

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cafe_bill
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Thu Jul 20, 2017 12:15 pm

Siper2 wrote:
Wed Jul 19, 2017 10:57 pm
The Savage/LS650P/S40 is a *great*, underrated bike.
... and the Savage can be turned into something very fun... http://www.rycamotors.com/
Bill
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Jimbo
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Fri Jul 21, 2017 5:20 am

I remember that episode with Jay Leno a few years ago when the café craze was just heating up. That does look like a neat conversion of the Savage.

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GAU-8
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Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:42 pm

We have a couple of theTU 250's at our MSF school. Fiine little bikes. Mechanically, the biggest item being replaced is the shift lever, when students drop the bike. Handlebars get bent easily too, but that's about it.

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johnny ro
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Sun Oct 01, 2017 8:44 am

Small and slow is a nice avenue to pursue. Takes one back to a time when there were good places to go where small and slow did the job.

The TU is fine, and can get what you need to upgrade it from Japan. Seats for example, on and on. Its not a new bike from the view of Suzuki.

For me, the SR400 is very very nice but the Versys 300 seems even more attractive/practical. Can plink along quietly and also get down the highway fine. The dirt bike position is more comfortable for many of us oldsters.

In the meantime, my yellow GF waits and I am running out there right now.

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Rix86
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Mon Oct 09, 2017 12:33 pm

Had an ls650 (Savage/s40) was quite fun. Not a great distance bike, vibration, being a thumper and all. I'd own another.
Cm400 i have cruises along easily.
I'd maybe look at the new rebels too.

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Unit562
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Tue Oct 10, 2017 2:10 am

There's something beautiful about smaller bikes. They're always simple, they just run, and they cost nothing to maintain or repair. I love my (still broken) SECA II, and I've loved my liter bikes, I've loved my DR650's, and at 6'3" and 300lbs I still love me a small bike. I'm currently trying to decide between a Rebel 500, Versys 300-X, XT250, and TW200. Out of all those? I'm SERIOUSLY leaning to the TW200 with a 2 tooth larger rear sprocket and power upgrades.
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