Fuel Canister Tubes

Gear, accessories, gadgets, etc that make your ride more enjoyable.
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fateddy
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Motorcycles Owned Currently: 1996 XJ600N, 1991 Suzuki DR350
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Sat Apr 29, 2017 11:38 pm

I've been planning on doing some touring again, and it would be nice to get into some more isolated areas, possibly where there's not gas available within my bike's ~120 mile range. Figuring out how to carry extra fuel is an issue, since I don't want to shell out for Rotopax or the other kind of pricey systems out there. It's preferable to have extra fuel somewhere outside the saddlebags, because 1.) if I ever do need it, I won't want to root around in my bags on the side of the road and 2.) I don't want my clothes and food and stuff to stink of gasoline if/when it vents or spills. I've been brainstorming on this problem for a few months now and picked radare's brain on it a little, which is a good way to solve a problem quickly. What I ultimately came up with is a couple ABS tubes with cleanout caps, mounted to my ammo can with river straps.

I picked up a few mending brackets and the associated hardware because I couldn't find small strap brackets at Home Depot. This was probably cheaper and will work just as well.
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With a nut in between the bracket and the lid of the ammo can, there's enough clearance for the river strap. I siliconed the holes inside the lid around the bolt and washer.
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The brackets could be used for anything when I don't have the fuel tubes mounted.
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The tubes are 3" ABS with a flat end cap. With the cleanout cap in, there's about 10.5" inside, which should be plenty of room for any fuel canister smaller than a 1.0 L MSR can (those are 3.2" in diameter and I didn't want to deal with 4" tubes). The tubes are cross drilled to allow any venting gas to escape, and keep air flowing so the internal temperature isn't too crazy in the desert in the summer. Any excess space will be stuffed with rags or foam or something.
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Lid still functions just fine with them in place.
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Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.

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radare
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Sun Apr 30, 2017 9:10 am

That things starting to look as utilitarian as my XJ :). Your 'Loud Pipes Risk Rights' sticker his one of my favorites.

The lockdown mounts are clever. I've been thinking of a way to secure items to my rear rack and with its forward pointing slats, find it difficult. Modifying that rack a bit to accommodate plates like you have there would work well, coupled with a small pair of straps for that Mexican blanket.

I like the idea of using the compression cap. How difficult is it to remove the wingnut with gloves on?

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fateddy
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Sun Apr 30, 2017 10:00 am

I think the wing nut will actually be easier with gloves than without. It's pretty big.

I don't know that I'll keep the compression caps, though. I didn't think about the fact that they would make for a flush surface on that end of the tube. The straps have nothing to catch should the tubes try to vibrate their way out to the sides as of now. I might put on a threaded cap as I'd originally planned. The other alternative is to tie a loop of paracord through the two vent holes on the end that the straps can pass through. Should be sufficient but not quite as elegant.


One of my thoughts with these is that I can also strap them onto the DR350 without too much fuss. That'll make me feel a little better about heading into the woods, as the stock tank is fairly small and I can't afford one of the nice higher-volume aftermarket tanks.
Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.

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xjardin
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Wed May 03, 2017 6:01 pm

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I was thinking about getting one of these just for emergencies. My bike has been doing poor on mileage and there are some long stretches of road where I could potentially run out my reserve before getting to a gas station.

The boxy form factor would make them easy to pack and the hole in the middle can be used to mount them. They have a 1.3 gallon capacity so three if them would almost double your range. They look pretty nice, I think I'm gonna get one when I get a chance.
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TonyKZ1
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Thu May 04, 2017 10:01 am

Yeah, I've thought about that also. I've seen quite a few of the ADV Riders carrying them for extra fuel storage. They also have ones for water if I remember right.
1997 Yamaha Seca II - mostly stock, Racetech upgraded forks, FZ6R rear shock, Oxford Adventure Style Heated Grips, Barkbusters Blizzard Cold Weather Handguards, a Scottoiler vSystem chain oiler. My Mileage Tracker Page.

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