Compasses (and GPS)

What makes your ride better? Gear, accessories, gadgets, etc that make your ride more enjoyable.
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arnehulstein
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Re: Compasses

Post by arnehulstein » Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:13 am

radare wrote:
Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:54 am
I think, ultimately, I'd like something that I can take off the bike and carry with me if I choose to hike around or camp. Something that has high accuracy.

Let's see, google . . .
Did I mention the 60CS already? ;) :lolno:

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Re: Compasses

Post by radare » Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:20 am

arnehulstein wrote:
Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:13 am
radare wrote:
Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:54 am
I think, ultimately, I'd like something that I can take off the bike and carry with me if I choose to hike around or camp. Something that has high accuracy.

Let's see, google . . .
Did I mention the 60CS already? ;) :lolno:
Did I forget to google the 60CS?

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arnehulstein
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Re: Compasses

Post by arnehulstein » Fri Feb 17, 2017 4:25 pm

radare wrote:
Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:20 am
Did I forget to google the 60CS?
Don't know. :) However, even though it seems like I am somewhat of a fanboy, I am not. I am on an allroad forum with all kinds of guys using military maps to go off-road etc. and they love their 60CS's. Some shell out more for 62 or even 64CS's, but there are many that still use the 60. Here is an Amazon link, just in case. But you'll have to find one on fleabay or Craigslist if you want to get one as they are now second hand.

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Re: Compasses

Post by radare » Mon Mar 13, 2017 10:49 am

fateddy wrote:
Thu Feb 16, 2017 10:33 am
A lot of GPS units are actually pretty reliable now in canyons and areas with a lot of canopy cover. I like the Garmin eTrex models. I used my wife's Garmin Nuvi on some Forest Service roads last weekend with no glitches at all. Even though I like to keep my paper map and analog compass skills up, I'll be running an onboard GPS in new territory.
How is that Nuvi treating you? I can get one on Amazon for under $100. I was up north of Red Feather on Friday and my paper map just didn't have enough detail to see the forest service roads. And the map detail on my cell phone requires data which didn't work because I had no signal.

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Re: Compasses (and GPS)

Post by fateddy » Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:31 am

It's a 2008 or 2009 unit, so practically steam-powered by GPS technology. You want to treat it like a modern touch screen because smart phones, but it won't do things like zoom with pinching and spreading your fingers or recenter with a quick tap. Same with dropping pins and stuff like that. The roads aren't smooth curves, the labeling isn't quite as elegant, and animation is a little laggy, so it doesn't feel quite as "live" as Google Maps. To pick up FS/BLM/County roads, you have to zoom in closer than I like, and without topo and water layers it has the feel of scanning across a very boring paper map with a 3"x4" magnifying glass. It's a nightmare to use when navigating multiple interstates and exits in a big city (think Denver or Tulsa), because the "exit on 251B, stay in right lane" type directions that we've come to expect from Google Maps are not there. I wouldn't use it anywhere I could get cell service or get by with an analog map.

With all that said, it's just fine as a quick heads up display, and will almost certainly get me around reliably. For getting around the mazes that are National Forests, it's great. Drop a pin at a turn, put in your destinations, import routes, record tracks, all that. I really don't like dealing with a ton of technological stimulation on the bike, and especially not in the woods, so it's really ideal for me. Outside of my job, I've always treated a GPS as a backup anyway, not a primary navigation device. I like navigating by the land and paper more anyway, as I'm much more likely to retain an accurate mental map that way. My wife occasionally expresses her frustration at my "drive around till I find a way" methods, but she'll acknowledge that I retain routes in my head pretty well.

So in short, I'm quite happy with it and won't be looking for a replacement.

My father-in-law has a unit that he really likes on his bike, I'll find out what it is and report back.
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Re: Compasses (and GPS)

Post by fateddy » Sat May 06, 2017 10:24 pm

I picked up a handlebar mount for my Nuvi.
It's not OEM, and it was fairly cheap. We'll see how it holds up to vibration. The position is pretty good, and it's not in the way.
Next thing I need to do is run a switched power relay to either a USB block or a 12V charging point to run it off the stator.
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So far, I'm happy enough with the Nuvi. I spent a day navigating around town with it in my truck, entering addresses, waypoints, all that. It's pretty simple. The one drawback is that you can't import routes onto it. You can upload waypoints easily, and then in the GPS during travel, pull any given set of waypoints into a route between your start point and destination. Turns, gas stops, points of interest, all the standard stuff.


I see in my last post, I said I'd check with my father in law and report back. Here's what he has to say. I thought I remembered him being pretty happy with his GPS, but I guess not. I suspect the model he has is the same as mine, the 260W.
I have an older NUVI that is waterproof. Not too sure of the model number. I like mine, but then I am not a power user like some of my friends. They tend to gravitate towards the Montana.
GPS choices suck. Garmin's software is clunky and not very intuitive. Several of us are using cell phones to varying success. I bought a $40 Kycero Android phone, without cellular service, to give that a try. The problem with cell phones is that you have to use about a half dozen different third party apps to do what you want to do.
I like my Garmin and use it mainly to get me back home and from point A to Point B. I never got proficient in BaseCamp to do much routing.
Sorry for like of usable advice, but like I said, GPS choices suck.
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Re: Compasses (and GPS)

Post by radare » Wed May 10, 2017 11:25 am

I think I'll buy a Nuvi too. Amazon has them for under $100, new. Do you think it'll work well on the forest service roads, say, up north of Red Feather?

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Re: Compasses (and GPS)

Post by fateddy » Sun May 14, 2017 9:48 am

All of the FS and county roads are on the unit, and I think there is total coverage for the US. I believe it's a basic software package that comes with the unit. It took updates from Basecamp and Garmin Express pretty easily, but I don't know if the main software package can be updated for new roads, decommissioned roads, etc. Haven't gotten that far yet.

At any rate, I just turned it on and found that everything that's not a trail is covered in the Roosevelt and surrounding areas, including Cherokee Park and Red Feather.
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Re: Compasses (and GPS)

Post by radare » Sun May 14, 2017 12:36 pm

fateddy wrote:
Sun May 14, 2017 9:48 am
At any rate, I just turned it on and found that everything that's not a trail is covered in the Roosevelt and surrounding areas, including Cherokee Park and Red Feather.
That is exciting! I have visions of fire roads dancing in my head.

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Re: Compasses (and GPS)

Post by AlecJ » Mon May 15, 2017 1:04 am

I can too recommend the Nuvi! I am still waiting on my bike gps mount from ebay, but have a 710 and 2595. They are great I had a tom tom for 3 days and chucked it they are horrible. For a compass I use my watch...
I ride solo

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