Consequences of throwing away oil level sensor

Maintenance, repair, troubleshooting, etc.
User avatar
Crimson
One of the Regulars
One of the Regulars
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 9:58 am
Region or State: London
Motorcycles Owned Currently: XJ600S
Contact:

Fri Jul 14, 2017 6:13 am

As I check my oil level in the sight glass before every ride, I was thinking about throwing away the oil level sensor on my bike, so that where it's fitted in the sump pan becomes a new, dedicated oil drain plug location. The reason for this is that I drain my oil from the oil level sensor unit's location (with the help of a siphon), as the normal oil drain bolt is far too seized to ever move. Meanwhile, leaving the oil level sensor installed, and removing it from time to time to drain oil, seems risky because it isn't designed for that, it has a strong seal and is tricky to pull out, and if the sensor breaks while coming out, that would result in a lot of trouble.

I was thinking of fabricating a blanking oil plug, located at the oil sensor, using a piece of mild steel, a copper crush washer, a drill and an angle grinder. I'm sure this will work well. One thing I'm concerned about is the behaviour of the oil level light on the dash. How does it work? Ideally, when the key is turned in the ignition, the light should remain on until the engine is started. I would like to keep it that way, even when the oil level sensor is removed.
Apart from that, can you think of any negative consequences of removing the oil level sensor?

Thanks in advance
A record of maintenance items carried out on my bike:
https://crimsonxj.wordpress.com/

User avatar
Casper
Almost as Awesome as Murdock
Almost as Awesome as Murdock
Posts: 2355
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2012 2:16 am
Region or State: Motor City (MI)
Motorcycles Owned Currently: 1994 XJ600, 2006 SV650

Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:33 am

As long as you keep that practice up, there shouldn't be an issue with this.

I am nut understanding the method with which you are thinking of using to make the plug.

I know not about the light situation if you remove it.
Men do not quit playing because they grow old; they grow old because they quit playing.

User avatar
TonyKZ1
XJ Enthusiast
XJ Enthusiast
Posts: 853
Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 12:15 pm
Region or State: Missouri, U.S.A.
Motorcycles Owned Currently: 1997 Yamaha XJ600s Seca II
Location: Marble Hill, MO. U.S.A.
United States of America

Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:34 am

Wouldn't it be easier to just fix the oil drain bolt? Even if you have to remove the oil pan and take it to a machine shop?
Eh, Just my :twocents: worth or opinion.
1997 Yamaha Seca II - mostly stock, Racetech upgraded forks, FZ6R rear shock, Oxford Adventure Style Heated Grips, Barkbusters Blizzard Cold Weather Handguards, a Scottoiler vSystem chain oiler. My Mileage Tracker Page.

User avatar
Crimson
One of the Regulars
One of the Regulars
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 9:58 am
Region or State: London
Motorcycles Owned Currently: XJ600S
Contact:

Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:44 am

Normally, yes. But I spent a whole day on it a couple of months ago. Even cut a slot into it, tried vice grips, heat and everything. I then gave it to a bike mechanic with a fully-stocked garage and every tool under the sun, and he said he couldn't do it (trying more extreme measures would risk breaking it). Removing the oil pan is possible but not an easy task, as it's fastened with allen head bolts and I don't trust them to not strip out (I tried them and they're iffy). It is, after all, a bike from 1995. I would say, I could remove them with some determination and persistence (heat, new gasket, fresh Allen keys, cutting slots into heads, etc), but the task at hand doesn't merit such efforts. The solution really is to use the oil level sensor hole. It's easy and it gets the job done. Lots of oil rushes out, and with the bike on the side stand, you can easily siphon off the remainder in the nooks and crannies.
A record of maintenance items carried out on my bike:
https://crimsonxj.wordpress.com/

User avatar
Crimson
One of the Regulars
One of the Regulars
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 9:58 am
Region or State: London
Motorcycles Owned Currently: XJ600S
Contact:

Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:52 am

Casper wrote:
Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:33 am
I am nut understanding the method with which you are thinking of using to make the plug.
I haven't thought it through all the way yet, but at the moment, it seems that the way forward would be to take the oil level sensor and cut it away from the base. So that I'm left with a smooth-cornered rhomboid piece of metal with two holes in it for attachment to the sump, and just adding a copper washer in between this bit of metal and the external body of the sump.
I know not about the light situation if you remove it.
I'll check and see what happens with the light if I disconnect the sensor.
A record of maintenance items carried out on my bike:
https://crimsonxj.wordpress.com/

User avatar
radare
Site Founder
Site Founder
Posts: 8445
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 12:42 pm
Region or State: Rocky Mountains
Motorcycles Owned Currently: '92 XJR600, '92 Seca II
Location: Denver, CO
Contact:
United States of America

Fri Jul 14, 2017 9:15 am

You can ditch the level sensor. Just keep a good eye on the oil level through the sight glass.

Have you consider, BTW, welding a nut onto the bolt and then wrenching it out? The heat from welding will generally break it free and the nut will give you a new surface to bite.

User avatar
Crimson
One of the Regulars
One of the Regulars
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 9:58 am
Region or State: London
Motorcycles Owned Currently: XJ600S
Contact:

Fri Jul 14, 2017 2:37 pm

Fantastic site here - all the answers and knowledgable and experienced people. Thank you all.

Yes, it's quite likely that welding a bolt onto the oil sump drain bolt would help to remove it. But it isn't on the horizon at the present time. I intend to learn to weld this year, so I may end up trying it at some point. For the time being though, I think I'll just adapt the oil level sensor.

I disconnected the oil level sensor and tested its behaviour. It behaves as normal. When the key is turned in the ignition, lights and neutral indicator come on, but not the oil light. When the starter button is pressed, the oil light comes on, but only for as long as the starter button remains pressed. Then the engine runs with no oil light lit. This is satisfactory as far as I'm concerned.

So now I know have a rough idea about what I'm going to do at the time of the next oil change. Thanks again.
A record of maintenance items carried out on my bike:
https://crimsonxj.wordpress.com/

User avatar
johnny ro
Lookin' Around
Lookin' Around
Posts: 24
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 12:27 pm
Region or State: NH USA
Motorcycles Owned Currently: wee strom K6, srx250, XJ600s

Sun Jul 16, 2017 7:00 am

Have you tried to vacuum the oil out through fill hole. Works on cars through the dipstick hole, maybe not bikes which have machinery right under the fill hole.

User avatar
Crimson
One of the Regulars
One of the Regulars
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 9:58 am
Region or State: London
Motorcycles Owned Currently: XJ600S
Contact:

Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:55 am

Yes. It doesn't work, even with a very narrow tube. Neither does siphoning oil from the oil filter hole. The solution I found, which is to drain via the oil level sensor hole, is the only one that works. I'm happy with this solution and it will be the permanent one once I've taken steps to prevent the body of the oil level sensor breaking in the sump pan during its removal.
A record of maintenance items carried out on my bike:
https://crimsonxj.wordpress.com/

User avatar
radare
Site Founder
Site Founder
Posts: 8445
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 12:42 pm
Region or State: Rocky Mountains
Motorcycles Owned Currently: '92 XJR600, '92 Seca II
Location: Denver, CO
Contact:
United States of America

Sat Jul 22, 2017 10:48 am

One thing I should have mentioned: The oil level sensor doesn't mount in the bottom of the sump. It sits up about an inch. You won't be able to get all of the oil out I'd bet 1/3 of the oil will still be in the sump. The oil sensor is the brass looking cylinder in the upper corner of this picture. Note how much of the sump is below that point. It aligns near perfectly with the gasket surface on the sump:

Image

Post Reply

Navigation:

  Search

  New Posts

  Unread Posts

  The Wall

  Gallery

  About Us


Call to Action:

  Forum Images

  Ride Relay


Cool Projects:

Predrag's Resto

Renegade's 93