fateddy's explorations

Share the ride report whether it be a day ride or a world trip.
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MOzarkRider
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Thu Oct 30, 2014 10:52 pm

Great Ride!! The weather looks spectacular.
"A life you don't live is still lost" Goo Goo Dolls
"Its not about the years of your life its about the life in your years" Abraham Lincon
92' Yamaha Seca II
14' KTM 200XC-W
Brian

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fateddy
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Sun May 03, 2015 3:06 pm

I took Friday off and rode to Taos, NM to meet up with my lady for a long weekend. I think it's about 350 miles or so. Good ride, mostly good weather. As is typical in the Rockies, I did run through a couple storms. Naturally, my camera battery was dead, but I got a couple pictures along the way with my phone.

This one dumped hail on me all through South Park (yes, where the show is based).
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Here's the San Luis valley.
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We're staying at a friend's vacation house near Taos Mountain.
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I got a camera battery so I'll have some good pictures when I get back home tomorrow night.
Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.

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fateddy
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Tue May 05, 2015 11:37 am

I have returned from a trip to Taos.

Last Friday, I took off work to head down to Taos. As I mentioned in the last post, my camera battery was dead, so pictures from that leg are limited to a couple from my phone.

Here's the route I took. It ended up being about 705 miles round trip.
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A big portion of that route is through the San Luis Valley in southern Colorado and into New Mexico.
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It's a beautiful valley, but the road is perfectly straight for a very long time. With a little detour through Alamosa, it's well over 100 miles of perfectly straight roads with a prevailing west wind. On the way down there, I ran through a nice storm. It was big enough that it kicked up a dust storm on the leading edge of it. There was a stretch of about 50 miles or so during which tumbleweeds were cannonballing across the road the whole time. Bizarre. I made it to Taos in about 9 hours or so, through quite a few interesting storms.

The intermountain west is... tumultuous during the spring. As such, I'll remember this trip as marked by the most impressive clouds ever. New Mexico always has interesting clouds, it seems, but this visit was especially remarkable. So most of my pictures from here on out are of the clouds.

This is looking up into the Carson National Forest northeast of Taos from the house we stayed at.
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We sat at a brewery for a few hours and watched this storm from the Taos Plateau.
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It dumped on the mouth of this canyon for a couple hours.
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Pretty decent beer to be found here. The best kolsch I've ever had. The brewery is built into an old airport hangar. Lots of rusty art, which is a common thing around Taos.
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We headed down to the Rio Grande for a soak in some hot springs with a bunch of naked people. The gorge is awesome. Lots of canyon wrens and other neat wildlife.
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I headed back north on Monday morning. Here's San Antonio Mountain, which is really just a big hill.
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A lot of northern New Mexico looks like this. Massive long basins with ranges off in the distance. The horizon is always very far away, it seems.
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Back in Colorado in the San Luis Valley, there's an alligator farm.
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You could buy some land adjacent to it if you're interested.
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At the north end of the valley, the clouds started to gather again. In anticipation of rain etc, I stopped and put on my rain gear.
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Looking up the road at what's ahead.
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Shortly after this, I started getting pounded by rain, so no more pictures until I made it up into the Arkansas River Valley.
These are the Collegiate Peaks and the town of Buena Vista. The peaks are so named because they have names like Princeton, Harvard, etc.
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I think all of them are over 14,000 feet.
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They're pretty socked in.
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Right after heading up out of the valley, I started getting pounded again by rain, freezing rain, and hail. No more pictures. It was a very cold, wet ride the rest of the way home. On the plus side, the bike handled great, and neither myself nor my luggage got wet.
Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.

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Full Circle
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Tue May 05, 2015 6:33 pm

Great pics and nice trip, gotta ask though... How was the Corbin?

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fateddy
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Tue May 05, 2015 10:44 pm

The seat was nice. After a couple hundred miles, pretty much any seat gets uncomfortable, so the trick is to take lots of 2 - 5 minute breaks on the side of the road and stretch. That's a nice thing about traveling on a motorcycle: you're outside the vehicle, so it's a lot less of a thing to just stop real quick right here and walk for a minute.

One thing about the Corbin: the front of it slopes up a bit more than stock seats. If I allow myself to slide forward in the saddle for any length of time, I find that my prostate gets a bit tight. I think that's more a body position issue than a seat issue, though. With my duffel bag on the pillion seat, I can lean right back and it cradles my hips a lot more naturally than the stock seat. I feel like all the fatigue I experienced was more a factor of sitting in basically one position for hours and gripping the bike than of a seat.
Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.

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fateddy
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Sat Sep 26, 2015 10:10 pm

My summer was incredibly busy and I was long overdue for a good ride. So today, radare and I headed out in search of some good dirt roads. Fall is coming pretty quickly here in the lower Rockies, so there was plenty of aspen and cottonwood foliage and crisp air. Lots of people were out recreating, including one guy who just could not get enough of radare's scrambler. It is a pretty elegant little machine up close, I have to admit. Anyhow, here's some pictures.

We started out riding through Stove Prairie, a pristine road tucked just inside the first range of the foothills with lots of rollers, nice sweeping turns, and good visibility. Excellent playful road.
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After a warmup through Stove Prairie, we turned into Poudre Canyon for a little stint of canyon twisties. And a short stop at a predictably disgusting campground privy.
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From the canyon, we turned onto the first dirt of the day and rode up to Red Feather Lakes to see how committed we were to dirt. Turned out to be a good idea. From there, we got up into aspen elevation pretty quickly. There was a beautiful band of them going up the mountain that we switchbacked back and forth through for the first few miles.
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After a quick lunch by the lake in Red Feather, we decided to continue with the dirt up to Prairie Divide.
Level 6 roads are no issue for an XJ as it turns out.
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I knew these bikes are perfectly capable of handling dirt, but I was actually pretty surprised at how well they do. Once I got used to skittering around most of the time and found the center of gravity, it was really enjoyable to just putter along through the woods. Toward the end, we maintained about 35 mph pretty comfortably.

I did rattle three engine mount bolts and my speedo cable loose, but that's another story.
Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.

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mikee112
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Sun Sep 27, 2015 12:56 pm

Fantastic !
We don't usually get dirt roads in the UK, if we do get any they are usually privately owned, 99% of public roads are surfaced ( I'm sure in the wilds of Scotland or Wales, or maybe even remote parts of England there are one or two, but they are not common :( )

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fateddy
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Wed Mar 30, 2016 1:02 pm

I haven't been doing much riding at all lately because it's still winter in the mountains. Here's what I've been up to instead:

phpBB [video]


The new GoPro is fun. Youtube's image stabilization does weird stuff to clouds and trees, but is nice because boy howdy does a headmounted camera get shaky fast.
Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.

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mikee112
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Thu Mar 31, 2016 12:31 pm

Great vid Eddy, looks beautiful up there :)
But please don't use the youtube image stabilization, it's horrible ( feels like some sort of weird acid trip ), I'd much rather see a bit of shake ( feels more real, gives a sense of movement, if you know what I mean :huh: )
If you want to minimize shake set the FOV to the widest setting, I think it's 170 degrees on the GoPro, it causes a warping effect at the edges of the image ( like a fisheye effect ) but it does minimize shake :)

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fateddy
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Thu Mar 31, 2016 12:54 pm

The super wide angle really grates on me. Watching head-mounted action videos with the camera set to wide angle makes me feel queasy. It does seem to offer a little bit of stabilization for the high-frequency shake, but the effect it has on the horizon is like being in a barrel rolling down a hill. I think it looks a bit gimmicky as well, kind of in the same way that a lot of HDR photos appear. So as personal preference, I'd much rather deal with that weird warping that Youtube's stabilization does to things. On that particular video, the high frequency vibration is bad enough in some sections (choppy snow, crust) that you can't even tell it's HD.
Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.

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