Jims XJ600N thread

Every XJ is a project whether big or small. Tell us about yours.
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MattP
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Region:: Silesia
Motorcycles:: 1996 XJ 600 Diversion
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Sun Jan 14, 2018 12:14 pm

Whoa! :o
The nut is gone!

Also, have you used any chain lube recently? Those sporadic spots of rust on sprocket may indicate something ;)

Still, the clean back of the engine looks great 8-)
'96 Seca II
Matt
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Slartibartfast
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Region:: Helensburgh, Scotland
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Sun Jan 14, 2018 1:30 pm

MattP wrote:
Sun Jan 14, 2018 12:14 pm
Whoa! :o
The nut is gone!

Also, have you used any chain lube recently? Those sporadic spots of rust on sprocket may indicate something ;)

Still, the clean back of the engine looks great 8-)
10 points to MattP! No nut or lock washer. The lock washer is completely gone. The nut was sat in one of the recesses of the cover :shock:

The bike has been sat for over a year without use, hence me trawling through and overhauling brakes, painting/powdercoating etc. I suspect I will be ordering a new front sprocket (already have a new chain and the rear is nearly new) - and a lock washer obviously!

Makes you wonder how many miles I did with no lock nut on the front sprocket - the only saving grace is that it's jammed on pretty tight and doesn't want to come off!
EIF wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:39 pm
"Yeah, the tank is making the house smell like a pickle factory and the signals have a sense of humor. Plus there was a handful of dogfood in the airbox."
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radare
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Mon Jan 15, 2018 9:29 am

Slartibartfast wrote:
Sun Jan 14, 2018 8:19 am

Next up was to remove the sprocket cover. 10 points to whoever can spot what is wrong here, this is exactly how it was when I moved the cover:

Image
:shock:
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Slartibartfast
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Region:: Helensburgh, Scotland
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Mon Jan 15, 2018 10:30 am

radare wrote:
Mon Jan 15, 2018 9:29 am

:shock:
Indeedy. I may well have done several hundred miles like that, and (with it being a new sprocket at the time) it probably hadn't yet seized on.

I can only assume that I didn't get the tabs on the lock washer bent up enough to lock the nut on, which frankly is a bit embarrassing. I'm usually quite careful but clearly something went wrong. It won't happen a second time.
EIF wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:39 pm
"Yeah, the tank is making the house smell like a pickle factory and the signals have a sense of humor. Plus there was a handful of dogfood in the airbox."
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Slartibartfast
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Tue Jan 16, 2018 7:07 am

Very little to report, and no pictures at all this time :-(

My new caliper has turned up though! And is now in bits. I had to use a grease gun to get the pistons moving, but happily they are actually in better shape than my own ones were so a result there!

I now need to degrease, clean and paint which I hope to do over the next couple of days.

I also need to get the swingarm back on the bike along with the torque arm, caliper mount bracket and rear caliper (which is assembled and ready to go).

I promise to take pictures of that though!
EIF wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:39 pm
"Yeah, the tank is making the house smell like a pickle factory and the signals have a sense of humor. Plus there was a handful of dogfood in the airbox."
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Slartibartfast
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Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:53 am

So I managed to grab an hour out at the bike again today. I'm finding it difficult to get any real time at it just now between work, family, the dog, as well as cold/dark/crappy weather. That said, today was a good day.

First up, the front sprocket. Despite liberal application of penetrating oil it wasn't ever going to move by hand. I was reluctant to batter seven shades of hell out of it (damn it, I do love me some mechanical persuasion) given what it is attached to. I was even more reluctant to heat it up; again, partly due to fear of melting/warping seals on the other end of it, and also partly because I cleaned the back of the engine with petrol and a rag and didnt want to melt my face off.

Which leaves engineering your way out of it. I looked online for sprocket pullers and the good ones aren't cheap. So the idea was to make one. My first thought was two bolts, with the head hooked in the sprocket teeth. The other end threaded through a hole in a short bar. This would have a third hole in the middle for the jacking bolt to go through. Sit a ball bearing between the jacking bolt and the sprocket shaft and tighten away till the sprocket popped off. Simples.

Turns out it didnt need to be that complicated; whilst perusing the scrap metal bins in the dockyard workshop, I found a short length of bar with a threaded wing-nut on one end and a nylon bush on the other! So I bent it to hook it over the sprocket, wound the wing nut onto the sprocket shaft and tightened it so it pulled the sprocket off. I got so carried away that I forgot to take a photo - and theres no way I was going to put the sprocket back on - but here's a pic of the tool itself. Just imagine a sprocket inbetween the two arms, you'll get the idea.

Image
EIF wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:39 pm
"Yeah, the tank is making the house smell like a pickle factory and the signals have a sense of humor. Plus there was a handful of dogfood in the airbox."
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Slartibartfast
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Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:03 am

Next up I decided to fit the swing arm. I wanted to do something that felt really constructive rather than just pulling stuff apart.

First step is to get the two end caps. These have a rubber seal and a washer in to keep muck and water out. Whip them bad boys out, and grease the inside of the end cap and the rubber seal:

Image

Image

Insert the rubber seal and the washer. Do this to both caps. Next job is to pack the roller bearings full of grease. Really grease 'em up, this isn't a job I want to do again:

Image

Image

You can now fit one end cap and turn the swingarm over so its at the bottom. Then grease and fit the bush to the bearings. Mine needed the gentlest of taps with a rubber mallet to get it through as it wouldnt go by hand (probably due to the grease). Once its flush fit the other end cap.

Image

Then line it up with the holes for the swingarm axle. This was actually a bit of a fiddle, and would have been far easier with both silencers removed but I had already fitted one. Once lined up, insert the axle to support it. Then offer the swingarm up to the shock absorber, line it up and insert the shock lower bolt; once both fitted, torque 'em up. Be careful if your bike isnt well supported, the lower shock mount is 64Nm and the swingarm axle is 91Nm (I think! check the manual don't quote me) so it would be quite easy to disturb the bike.

Marvel at your shiny new swing arm:

Image

Image
EIF wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:39 pm
"Yeah, the tank is making the house smell like a pickle factory and the signals have a sense of humor. Plus there was a handful of dogfood in the airbox."
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Casper
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Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:15 pm

I like the puller.
Men do not quit playing because they grow old; they grow old because they quit playing.
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Slartibartfast
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Region:: Helensburgh, Scotland
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Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:04 am

Not much to report. I managed to get an hour in this morning before the cold forced me back inside - we've now had at least an inch of snow in the last hour and a half and its still coming down, so I opted for making soup and having a cuppa instead.

Got the remaining exhaust polished (indoors, in the warm, much to Mrs Jims delight) and fitted. Got the factory rear wheel loosely installed allowing me to jack the front wheel off the floor and remove it to get the brake discs off.

This is, without a doubt, the single best tool I've bought in the last 12 months:

Image

If you don't own one of these, you should. Nice and cheap, and incredibly effective.

If your brake disc fasteners look like this:

Image

(photo obviously taken after I'd loosened them!!!) then you will almost certainly round some of the heads trying to remove them as they are threadlocked and torqued in.

So, applying a little heat to the wheel in the vicinity of each disc bolt and voila!

Image

I reckon somewhere in the region of 30 secs or so is enough. I could just feel the allan key getting a little warm.

Not the easiest photo to take on your own either!
EIF wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:39 pm
"Yeah, the tank is making the house smell like a pickle factory and the signals have a sense of humor. Plus there was a handful of dogfood in the airbox."
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Slartibartfast
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Posts: 461
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 4:30 am
Region:: Helensburgh, Scotland
Motorcycles:: 1999 XJ600N
Great Britain

Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:59 am

Very quiet just now. All I've managed to do is get the tyre off the front wheel.

Do it myself, I thought. Save a few quid, I thought. How hard can it be, I thought.

Very is the answer. Never took any photos (again) as I quickly got cross trying to remove it. Tried using a vice, tried jacking down onto it, but that bead was (glued) on real tight!

As I'm not using the tyre again, I cut through it with a hacksaw (difficult and time consuming) to the point where I could get a big set of snips through the carcass to cut across the tyre. And I still needed to jump on it to get the bead off!

More importantly though is that the wheels are booked in for powdercoat on friday to collect on monday :-) :-)
EIF wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:39 pm
"Yeah, the tank is making the house smell like a pickle factory and the signals have a sense of humor. Plus there was a handful of dogfood in the airbox."
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