Cake's XJ 600 S

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TonyKZ1
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Motorcycles Owned Currently: 1997 Yamaha Seca II
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Re: Cake's XJ 600 S

Post by TonyKZ1 » Tue Oct 20, 2015 8:29 am

cake wrote: I have just tried them on a single ride yesterday and they sure produced plenty of heat. I found that 100% and 75% quickly became too much. Most of the time I ran them on 50%. I think it was around 10 C (50 F) outside and I was comfortable the whole ride (which was a short one though) :)

In your experience in what sort of temperature can can you ride (with these grips) while still being completely comfortable?
I ride down to under 20*F, (coldest I've rode was 12*F and that was before I had heated gear b-r-r-r). At 30 I've got them on 75-100 and you can still feel the heat. Some of it depends on your gloves, if they've got a lot of insulation then they're keeping some of the heat from getting to your hands. What you want is a pair that's got insulation on the backs of the hands but either thin insulation or just leather on the palms so it doesn't prevent the heat from getting to your hands.

Now when it gets cold, I'm also wearing a 12V electric heated vest from Widder, it's not as nice as a full heated jacket liner but it takes less power too. That company is closed but there are other companies selling heated gear of course.

I also use a pair of cold weather hand-guards that I picked from Twisted Throttle. They help block the cold wind/rain from my hands and help the heated grips work better. I've used hippo hands and equivalents handlebar muff or mitts in the past and they work good too.
1997 Yamaha Seca II - mostly stock, Racetech upgraded forks, FZ6R rear shock, Oxford Sports Style Heated Grips, Barkbusters Blizzard Cold Weather Handguards, a Scottoiler vSystem chain oiler. My Mileage Tracker Page.

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cake
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Motorcycles Owned Currently: 93' XJ 600 Diversion

Re: Cake's XJ 600 S

Post by cake » Tue Oct 20, 2015 11:10 am

MichaelX wrote:I have the same ones and they are 138mm long, i think sport are 132mm . Stock grips are 140 mm thats why its a gap there, you can move them 2mm to the end of the bars so it covers the bar ends.
Btw did you use the glue from the box? Mine did not stick on the left grip so i have to glue with something else
I did think about moving it as close to the bar end as possible (as on the left side), but then I would have a large space between the throttle housing and the grip. I put it kind of in the middle :) I guess the neatest solution would be to cut off some of the throttle tube and move the throttle housing a bit towards the bar end weight.

These are the specifications from Oxford. I don't know if they are accurate.
Adventure (OF690) 132mm/122mm
Sport (OF692) 123mm/114mm
Touring (OF691) 120mm/110mm

Yes, I did use the included glue. I have not noticed any slippage ... yet :!:

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cake
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Re: Cake's XJ 600 S

Post by cake » Tue Oct 20, 2015 11:29 am

TonyKZ1 wrote:I ride down to under 20*F, (coldest I've rode was 12*F and that was before I had heated gear b-r-r-r). At 30 I've got them on 75-100 and you can still feel the heat. Some of it depends on your gloves, if they've got a lot of insulation then they're keeping some of the heat from getting to your hands. What you want is a pair that's got insulation on the backs of the hands but either thin insulation or just leather on the palms so it doesn't prevent the heat from getting to your hands.

Now when it gets cold, I'm also wearing a 12V electric heated vest from Widder, it's not as nice as a full heated jacket liner but it takes less power too. That company is closed but there are other companies selling heated gear of course.

I also use a pair of cold weather hand-guards that I picked from Twisted Throttle. They help block the cold wind/rain from my hands and help the heated grips work better. I've used hippo hands and equivalents handlebar muff or mitts in the past and they work good too.
That's some serious cold weather riding gear you got there. I have actually also considered getting some handguards - mostly as wind protection. But I probably wouldn't go with as large ones as you've got and if I go with anything smaller (perhaps the Barkbusters Storm) I'm not sure if they'll help anything anyway? Good points about the gloves.

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MichaelX
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Motorcycles Owned Currently: 1997 YAMAHA XJ 600 N

Re: Cake's XJ 600 S

Post by MichaelX » Thu Oct 22, 2015 12:34 am

After looking on the box i see its 132mm, you are right they are 132mm:). When i bought them i was looking at the next grips on the catalog which are 138mm (cruiser ones).
Yes to move the right hand grip to the right u need to cut a bit on the throttle tube. I will get new bar ends on mine next year to fix the gap. Anyway the grips are really nice to have, i was turning them on at the slightest temperature drop just because why not!:D So enjoy them as much as i do. :thumbsup:
1997 XJ600N Diversion
-(rusted inside)Marving Master 4 in 2 exhaust system
-DID X-Ring Chain 520 VX-Gold 110 Link
-Oxford Adventure Style Heated Grips

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cake
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Re: Cake's XJ 600 S

Post by cake » Sun Mar 27, 2016 4:00 pm

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Just had my first few rides of the year this weekend. The sun was out and the temperature was a little under 10°C (50°F). It was nice to have the heated grips on – it made the rides totally comfortable.

Spark plugs
Before I started the engine for the first ride I replaced all the spark plugs. The plugs certainly looked different, but I'm not sure the function was any different – the engine was still somewhat tough to start. The old plugs was as far as I know of the wrong type (CR7E) so I wanted to replace them with a set of CR8E's.

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Quickly did I find out that I have gotten plugs with a different terminal. After some examination of the plugs I thought it would be possible to simply screw off the terminals. I searched the internet and it seemed like there was very different experiences of doing so – some broke the spark plug while others were able to remove the terminal successfully. I reckoned that if I just tried carefully I wouldn't break anything. Using pliers and a piece of cloth I was able to remove the terminal on all four plugs without any drama.

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Handlebar risers
I don't have any pictures of this, but I also mounted a pair of 25 mm handlebar risers in order to achieve a more upright riding position on the bike. It was a very nice change, but I would not mind to sit even more upright. I was unsure how much the bar could be lifted without the need for longer cables, wires and brake lines though and so I decided on 25 mm straight risers.

Valve adjustment
I knew I would inevitable have to face this. I have procrastinated the task as I've found it a bit scary to open up the internals of the engine. By doing all sorts of other maintenance on the bike however I was finally able to pull my self together and check/adjust the valves. It did not go quite as smooth as I've hoped though...

I wanted to have as much room as possible when doing this procedure for the first time, so I removed everything that could possible get in the way: fairing, tank, air box and carburettors. I also wiped off the valve cover as well as wires etc. to prevent debris entering falling down into the engine.

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I started out measuring cylinder #1 and then check the shim size. Measuring went fine, but I did not find the standard valve shim removal tool (a copy of the original Yamaha tool) very easy to use. It was acceptable on cylinder #1 and #4, but very difficult on cylinder #2 and #3. Even when it did not slip I found that the tool would leave small chips of its chrome coating on the valve bucket. I could not accept this and so I was forced to use one of the other ways of reaching the valve shims I've read about here on XJR. I decided on loosening the camshafts which made it somewhat a bigger task (mentally at least) than I set out for initially. It did provide me access to all the shims though. I noted down the shim sizes, wrapped up the engine with a plastic bag and called it a night.

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cake
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Re: Cake's XJ 600 S

Post by cake » Tue Apr 19, 2016 3:08 pm

Thanks to predrag's very helpful post on alternatives to original valve shims, I was able to get a good deal on some Metelli shims. The price was significantly lower (around 2 EUR per shim) than the price of originals, so I actually bought a bunch. This should make sure I had the right ones (especially for one valve which I could not get a measurement on because of it being too tight). Also I might not have to buy additional shims for the next valve adjustment.

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I was able to get some very nice clearances in the upper part of the tolerance range. Except for one valve which got just within the lower spec. I was inclined to put in a smaller shim so that it would be just 0.01 mm too loose, but decided to stay within spec.

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The gasket on the timing chain tensioner was very tough to get off. I tried to use some gasket remover which did not impress me a whole lot but it did help some. At least I was able to clean up the tensioner without leaving any scratches. I did not have a replacement copper shim for the tensioner. I measured it at 19 mm OD, 12 mm ID and 2 mm thick should I need a new one.

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Eventually I had the bike completely assembled again except for the tank where I connected a small external one allowing me to synchronize the carburettors after I got the bike started.

But start it would not! :???:

I tried starting it multiple times for several seconds, before the already half empty battery died. I was happy that the engine cranking sounded good indicating I assembled everything correctly so I was actually not worried. At this point it was late so I attached the battery charger for the night.

I thought that it had to be a missing spark or fuel. I did not see much fuel leave the tank when I connected it to the bike so I determined that the carbs was lacking fuel. I knew (thanks to this forum) this could actually be a problem even though everything was connected corectly, so first thing the following morning I went out to the bike, connected the tank directly to the carbs and opened the drain screws on the carbs. Sure enough no fuel was coming out, but soon I could hear the fuel ooze into the bowl. I did the same procedure on the remaining carbs, pushed the starter button and it started right up! Ignoring the presumed clutch rattle it sounded sweet. I was very satisfied! :thumbsup:

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cake
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Re: Cake's XJ 600 S

Post by cake » Sun May 01, 2016 12:05 pm

It has been two weeks since the valve adjustment and I'm very happy with the result. The bike starts easier and warm up time is much shorter :)

Next up:
  • Adjust pilot jets (spark plugs are fouled)
  • Fix clutch basket rattle (presumed)
  • Adding lights to the top box

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cake
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Re: Cake's XJ 600 S

Post by cake » Sun May 01, 2016 12:08 pm

Oh yeah, for this year I will try to track fuel consumption. For the last two fillups I averaged:

25 km/l (59 mpg)

I think that's pretty darn good!

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cake
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Re: Cake's XJ 600 S

Post by cake » Sat Feb 25, 2017 4:40 pm

I didn't post many updates in 2016. Mainly because I didn't get to look into any of the stuff I wanted to do. I did ride 4016 km (~2500 miles) though and as I wrote in the last post I would try to track all fill ups — which I did. The average fuel consumption was:

22.2 km/l (52.2 mpg)

This includes quite a bit of highway and thus I find it quite satisfactory.

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