Diversion adventure project.

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radare
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Re: Diversion adventure project.

Post by radare » Sat Aug 12, 2017 1:03 pm

SuperDev13 wrote:
Sat Aug 12, 2017 12:34 pm
Project looks great and I couldn't help but laugh at the tank incident.
What do you mean?

Fenty
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Re: Diversion adventure project.

Post by Fenty » Sun Aug 13, 2017 4:49 pm

Pt. 6. - Miscellaneous Tinkering.

Hi all, first off thank you for the feedback and support. I'm glad to see the work so far and the concept is well received.

So there has been a fair bit of messing about in the garage over the past week or so and I stupidly failed to take any photos of most things I've done. I got too involved with what I was doing that the camera became an oversight so my description alone will have to do for most of it.

At the start of the week I set out to satisfy a niggling concern that the new exhaust sat slightly higher than the stock exhaust on the bike.
My concern was that I may have inadvertently ruined all my hard work on the pannier rack in this oversight. If you were curious about the Delkavic exhaust, I can safely say it's fantastic, however something considerably less fantastic was being right. The end of the cans were around half an inch too high to get the boxes positioned on what I was fairly certain was their lowest fitting.
By this stage I've spent a total of around four days building this rack to fit as well as my skills would allow so to say I was disappointed would be an understatement.
Around an hour later I had carefully and successfully negotiated the cans into a slightly lower position so everything just about fits where it should. Crisis evaded :)

Moving on to the next hold up - there is no possible way I can think of that allows me to use the stock indicators with the panniers positioned as they are, I had contemplated fitting them to the bottom of the reg plate so they sit just below the pannier but I wasn't fond of the appearance, I'm also not sure if it's legal and I had my doubts about their security fixed to a piece of thin plastic plate threatening to get dragged into the back wheel.
Another option was a set of mini indicators to fit in the original position but small enough to allow for the boxes. Simple, easy and convenient. This idea does come with the drawback of the indicators only being visible from directly behind leaving them quite redundant for changing lanes on the motorway... NEXT!
Ok, third and final idea which seems to be the winner. Get a set of indicators intended for mounting to fairings that sit flush to a flat surface. These can be fitted to the back of the boxes and wired in through the box. Sturdy visible and simple!
Though they are as cheap as a tank of fuel, funds have dried up for the month so they will have to go on the waiting list for now.

Next on the to-do list was to locate the cause of my intermittent brake light issue. Sometimes it works fine, sometimes it needs persuading to work and on this occasion it was flatly refusing to work.

- Advanced warning. A can of worms is about to be opened -

Starting with the back brake, a bit of wiggling and stomping on the pedal got it working but it still wasn't very happy so I started pulling off fairings to inspect the wires, there it is, a snag in the wire, touching but only just... soldered, taped and test again, this got it working but the pedal is pressed to a point where my wheel would be locked up and preparing to launch me over in retaliation. A simple enough adjustment on the height of the switch and the back brake lights up nicely.
Now to the front brake where things stop being simple. The brake lever is having no effect at all on the light so again try wiggling the wires, the light flickers but the lever is still having no effect. I try pushing the wires towards the switch to diagnose a poor connection, the tail lights up, great stuff... except my hand isn't pulling the lever at all. I try moving the wires again just to be sure and get the same result. At this point I should have grabbed a light to see clearly what was going on, but I didn't, I continued to fumble around...
Once again I made a sudden loud noise in the garage that my neighbours may be judging me for.
If you check on your own cherished xj600's you may see behind the front brake switch a plug that connects from the switch into the wiring harness. On mine no such plug exists, just two bare wires stuffed in - or more accurately near - the contacts... and I stuck my finger in there...
So there are some faulty electrics, good to know!
Of course this prompted a full strip down and inspection of the rest of the wiring. As far as I could tell the rest of the plugs were present and accounted for but that was where the good news ended. A large portion of the looms insulation has been taken off so there was a hopeless tangle of wires stuffed under the air box and there are 3/4 wires that have just been chopped and left exposed. I don't know their purpose yet but there's going to be a fairly large chunk of time committed to fixing this. For now I'll just have to to insulate everything as best I can and hope I don't start a fire.

New days work... this time I remembered photos. So the pannier rack fits, I'm waiting to get some nylock nuts so I don't find myself constantly re-tightening everything with the vibration and I need to fit some steel backing plates inside the boxes for a bit more structural security but today just consisted of filing and grinding down all the rough edges and painting.

Image

On with the primer. Little effort for a perfect finish was made. Most of it will be consealed on the bike, this is just for rust prevention purposes.

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One coat - black

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Two coats black and hang to dry
Meanwhile I'm presented with time to prep the boxes for use, drilled out the odd rivets left in place by the previous owner, there were few clues what the boxes did in their previous life, but they were scattered with fine grey dust and air rifle pellets... just in case you wanted to know. Once all the rivets were out I filled in all holes with silicone sealant and gave them a good clean. They're not particularly pretty but pretty wasn't in the criteria for my needs so they'll do just fine.

Image

That's all for now, there will be more details when I start fitting the panniers or attack the wiring harness, whichever comes first.
There's still plenty to be done yet before this old girl will pass for an adventurer and of course the updates will continue as and when.
Rubber side down.

Fenty
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Re: Diversion adventure project.

Post by Fenty » Wed Aug 16, 2017 11:27 am

Image

Pt 7. I almost have panniers!

As mentioned previously the rack was completed, test fitted and painted.
At this point I suspected there may have been a waiting period for the elusive payday but I've cashed in my penny jar and got things moving again.
The indicators have been ordered and are due to arrive early next week and the essential purchase of 100 nyloc nuts has left me with approximately 80 spares once fitted to the bike...

With all parts gathered for the rack it can now be fitted and left on. The long term plan is to use the stock indicators that patrude the rack while the panniers are removed. The new indicators can be permanently fixed to the boxes that can be plugged in easily under the seat.
Perfect photo oppertunity, freshly washed and racks fitted, I'm quite fond of this look.

Image

In the preparation for the final fitting I've been giving some thought to the appearance of the boxes, and I have to admit, they are a bit of an eye sore. I thought I'd make that extra bit of effort with them and paint them with the last of the black frame paint.

Step one. Masking - so much masking.

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Step two. Apply a heavy dosing of black gloss, wait a day then apply another heavy dose.

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Step three. Delicately peel off masking tape
(Optional step. Curse failings of step 1)

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Step four. Attack rough edges with razor blade and enjoy finished result

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At this stage I can pretty much call this section finished, there will be photos of the completed luggage section once the indicators arrive and have been fitted but the build is complete pending final assembly.

Further down the line I will also be fitting a top box to complete the back end luggage - and give the impatient Mrs her all important throne at the back. This will obviously require further modification to the rack to mount because I've already taken up the mounting points of the bikes frame but that's for a later day.
Rubber side down.

GAU-8
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Re: Diversion adventure project.

Post by GAU-8 » Thu Aug 17, 2017 3:12 pm

Good stuff!

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